Acoustic virtuoso Muriel Anderson’s Nov. 18 stop at Valparaiso’s Cornucopia Coffee Company comes at a time where she is mixing business with pleasure.

Her sole show in Northwest Indiana comes during a week plus-long stop in Chicago, in which the Downers Grove-reared musician and songwriter spends Thanksgiving with her family as well as performs a handful of shows in and around her old stomping grounds.

“I do a big annual concert in Downers Grove,” she said. “Every year, my mother and my sisters make baked goods for the audience, which is usually 500 people, and give them away at intermission. It’s become a big tradition, and I hope to bring some of that festive mood to Valparaiso.”

Anderson, who calls Nashville home these days, studied classical music at DePaul University. After graduation, she won the National Fingerstyle Guitar Championship and became the first woman to receive that title. In 1989, Anderson released her first proper solo effort, “Heartstrings,” and has put out nearly two dozen efforts, be they in her own right or collaborative efforts, ever since.

Additionally, Anderson has released scores of instructional acoustic books and DVDs. A pair of new tutorial DVD’s, “1,2,3 Finger Style” and “50 Right-Hand Techniques,” recently hit the shelves.

Crossing a myriad of musical genres – both on record and in concert, Anderson has written and performed in bluegrass, classical, pop, jazz and world music genres, to name just a few – Anderson, despite all of her acclaim and recognition, described her evolution as a musician as a continuous work in progress.

“Music, for me, is something that I do for fun and for the love of it,” she said. “It’s something that I’ve kept consistent and, in doing so, it continues to move for me in different and new directions.”

Anderson is planning to follow-up her last original set, 2010’s “Harp Guitars Under the Stars,” with a double album. One of the discs, she said, will be a collection of lullabies, and the second is a series of songs to wake up to.

“The one (with the songs to wake up to) will be gently energizing and very positive music to put you in a positive mood,” she said. “The lullaby album is music for all ages. It’s not just a child’s lullaby album.”

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Features reporter

Eloise is A&E Editor and a food, entertainment and features writer for The Times, subjects she has covered for over two decades in and around the Region. She was the youngest of eight in a Chicago household filled with fantastic cooks and artists.