Franciscan Alliance has acquired a 35,000-square-foot hospital site in Hobart.

The hospital system, one of the Region's largest, bought the former location of Hind General Hospital for an undisclosed price, announced McColly Bennett Commercial.

“We had a great deal of interest from groups across the country,” stated Michael Siwietz of McColly Bennett. “Franciscan Alliance Inc. is a regional health provider with a strong track record of community service and reinvestment that made them an attractive buyer. They will be a great addition to the medical community in Hobart.”

Located on 17 acres at the southwest corner of 61st Avenue and Lake Park Avenue, the single-story property originally was constructed in 1989 as Charter Hospital, a mental health facility. In 2004, it became Hind General Hospital, an acute care surgical center.

The property has been vacant since 2014. The site is south of St. Mary Medical Center, owned by Franciscan competitor Community Healthcare System.

Franciscan didn't respond to requests for comment on its plans for the property.

The move continues Franciscan's aggressive expansion strategy. The hospital group is in talks to merge with Methodist Hospitals, Northwest Indiana's third-largest hospital system. Franciscan is also building a new, $232-million hospital in Michigan City and a $46-million cancer center in Munster.

Siwietz and Jeff Bennett of McColly Bennett and Steve Malley of Lee & Associates in San Diego facilitated the sale for Hanmi Bank. Franciscan Alliance was represented by Ken Catellier, vice president of real estate for Tonn and Blank Construction, a Franciscan subsidiary.

Subcribe to the Times

Reporting like this is brought to you by a staff of experienced local journalists committed to telling the stories of your community.
Support from subscribers is vital to continue our mission.

Become a subscriber

Thank you for being a loyal subsciber

Your contribution makes our mission possible.

 
5
1
3
0
4

Health reporter

Giles is the health reporter for The Times, covering the business of health care as well as consumer and public health. He previously wrote about health for the Lawrence (Kansas) Journal-World. He is a graduate of Northern Illinois University.