Industry fights safety retrofit of older rail cars

2013-07-29T17:57:00Z 2013-07-29T18:05:07Z Industry fights safety retrofit of older rail carsThe Associated Press The Associated Press
July 29, 2013 5:57 pm  • 

WASHINGTON | The oil industry and U.S railroads are resisting the Obama administration's attempt to boost safety standards for the type of rail car involved in a fiery, fatal explosion in Canada, citing costs and technical challenges.

Industry groups say it is impractical to retrofit tens of thousands of existing tank cars used to haul oil, even as they have adopted voluntary standards to ensure that cars ordered after October 2011 meet tough requirements recommended by federal transportation experts following a deadly ethanol train derailment and explosion in Illinois two years earlier.

The agency is considering a plan intended to fix a dangerous design flaw, noted as far back as 1991, in a rail car commonly used to haul oil and other hazardous liquids from coast to coast. The soda-can shaped car, known as the DOT-111, has come under scrutiny from safety experts because of its tendency to split open during derailments and other major accidents.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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