Porter receives AFib certification

2014-03-07T17:15:00Z 2014-03-07T19:58:14Z Porter receives AFib certificationTimes Staff nwitimes.com
March 07, 2014 5:15 pm  • 

LIBERTY TOWNSHIP | The Society of Cardiovascular Patient Care awarded Porter Regional Hospital with full atrial fibrillation certification, the first health care facility in the state to earn that honor from the society.

Atrial fibrillation, commonly called AFib, is a quivering or irregular heartbeat that can lead to blood clots, stroke, heart failure and other heart complications, according to the American Heart Association.

The association estimates 2.7 million Americans live with the condition, which can increase a person's risks for stroke and related heart problems.

To earn the certification, the hospital had to meet a set of criteria and undergo a review by an accreditation review specialist from the Society of Cardiovascular Patient Care, according to the hospital.

Facilities with AFib certification must demonstrate expertise in multiple areas, including emergency assessment of patients with AFib, treatment for patients in the ER in AFib and AFib community outreach.

"We are pleased to receive this important certification that recognizes our unique expertise in atrial fibrillation," said Terri Gingerich, Porter’s cardiovascular service line director, in a news release. "Over the years, our cardiovascular team has developed a program that offers many options for our patients who have atrial fibrillation."

Porter Regional Hospital is home to the Center for Cardiovascular Medicine, which it considers a heart hospital within the hospital.

The center offers AFib treatment options, such as an electrophysiology program with AFib ablation and other procedures.

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