The 40s

The dance "The 40s" was one of the numbers performed by Hubbard Street Dance Chicago during its Summer Series.

Provided

Fans of Hubbard Street Dance Chicago had the opportunity to see many of the troupe's best works during a special engagement.

The company kicked off its 40th anniversary with its Season 39 Summer Series recently at the Harris Theater for Music and Dance in Chicago.

In the spotlight during the show were stellar pieces from every decade that the dance company has been in existence.

From more modern and whimsical numbers to classic jazz pieces, the group's repertoire proved eclectic, exciting and definitely representative of its 40 years on the scene.

The show opened with the modern, strong duet "Imprint," choreographed by Lucas Crandall.

Among highlights in the production was Twyla Tharp's "The Golden Section," featuring music by David Byrne. Hubbard Street's dancers, wearing gold-colored costumes, easily captivated the audience in this creative piece.

Another number garnering great applause was "A Picture of You Falling," starring choreography by Crystal Pite.

For audience members who have been Hubbard Street fans since the beginning when the majority of the troupe's dances were choreographed by founder Lou Conte, the two ending numbers remained the dances most fans were waiting for.

"Georgia," featuring the classic tune by Hoagy Carmichael, is a glamorous and beautiful number while Conte's "The 40s," featuring music by Sy Oliver, offers energetic, crisp and clean jazzy choreography that is always fun to watch.

Other numbers in the show were "One Flat Thing, reproduced," by William Forsythe; "One Thousand Pieces (Water Section)," by Alejandro Cerrudo; and "Palladio," by Jim Vincent.

For more information on Hubbard Street Dance Chicago, visit hubbardstreetdance.com or call the troupe's ticket office at 312-850-9744.

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Eloise writes about food and entertainment for The Times, subjects she has covered for over two decades in and around the Region. She was the youngest of eight children in a Chicago household filled with fantastic cooks and artists.