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John Cain

John Cain

TV icon Ed Asner is headed to the Memorial Opera House in Valpo with his new comedy, “A Man And His Prostate.” This seven-time Emmy-winner is one of the most honored actors in television history with five Golden Globe Awards and a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Screen Actors Guild. The voice of Carl Fredricksen in the Pixar smash “Up,” Asner is perhaps best remembered for his roles on “The Mary Tyler Moore Show,” “Lou Grant,” “Roots,” “Rich Man Poor Man,” “The Good Wife” and many others. Asner toured the country in the one-man play “FDR,” based on the life and career of President Franklin D. Roosevelt. “A Man And His Prostate” is based on the playwright’s true-life experience of being rushed to a hospital for prostate cancer surgery while vacationing in Italy. A serious subject, indeed, yet critics have called it a “hilarious evening of entertainment.” Judge for yourself on one night only, at 8 p.m. Wednesday. 219/548-9137 or www.memorialoperahouse.com

Sacred Prehistoric Art of the American West

South Shore Arts is currently showcasing colorful works by award-winning contemporary artist Dorothy Graden in the Atrium of the Center for Visual and Performing Arts, Munster. Inspired by her travels to prehistoric rock art sites in the American West, the artist shares her own interpretations of the art that early hunter/gatherers left on stone hundreds of years ago to convey the great strength and sorrows of the people. Giving an authenticity to her art, Graden creates textured, hand-pulled and dyed cotton paper. Each sheet is a one-of-a-kind work of art, with the pulp carefully layered on the rag, providing a three-dimensional look that can only be attained by using this method. After 25 years as a teacher in Valparaiso, Graden now pursues her artistic interests full time. The exhibit runs through June 18. 219/836-1839 or www.dorothygraden.com.

Wilkommen!

In the 1930s, in a world on the brink, the English writer Christopher Isherwood introduced us to 1930s Berlin, where he lived a life of semi-debauchery among the demi-monde. Immortalized in the play “I Am a Camera,” as well as the Broadway and film versions of the musical “Cabaret,” the Kit Kat Klub, with its mischievous emcee and assorted denizens, is a nighttime haunt where cabaret singer Sally Bowles seductively beckons us to “Come hear the music play.” With music by John Kander and lyrics by Fred Ebb, “Cabaret” was the winner of eight Tony awards, including Best Musical and Best Original Score. As Sally sings, “What good is sitting alone in your room? Life is a cabaret, old chum, come to the cabaret.” You can visit the Kit Kat Klub at Theatre at the Center from May 5 through June 4. 219/836-3255 or www.theatreatthecenter.org

John Cain is the executive director of South Shore Arts and the Northwest Indiana Symphony Orchestra. He can be reached at (219) 836-1839, ext. 102. The opinions are the writer’s.

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