HOME AND LIFESTYLE SHOW

New harmonies reflect changing themes in color and design

2014-04-03T10:27:00Z New harmonies reflect changing themes in color and design nwitimes.com
April 03, 2014 10:27 am

While rigid color rules have been replaced by more creative options, color and style coordination in home interiors is a consistent goal. Lifestyle patterns and tastes are consistently evolving and so are the resulting forecasts that are spawning new harmonies in both color and design, according to the experts at Pantone, the leading authority on color and provider of color systems.

Color forecasts can validate some pre-conceived color choices, while also providing new inspiration and direction. In almost every space of your home, color can be the most important decorating decision you’ll make.

Color is a language. Color is one of the most fulfilling elements in our lives. Color can attract your attention or change your mood. It speaks to who you are, how you feel and where you're going. When putting together the perfect colors for your home and lifestyle, Sherwin-Williams suggests considering how color makes you feel and what it says about you.

Because it is one of the first things you notice when you walk into a room, colors and the way they're applied give voice to your personality and décor. Color sets the mood. From floor to ceiling, paint color reflects your style and makes a personal statement of what home means to you – uniting one-of-a-kind accent pieces with manufactured items throughout your home.

For example, electrifying hues, inspired by technology, bring a touch of whimsy to spaces that also feature natural carved wood, woven textiles and wrought iron.

These bright colors are further enhanced when paired with large areas of negative space.

When it comes to using color inside your home, the color experts at Sherwin-Williams have developed a few “rules of thumb” for color placement in an effort to help those with a modest CCQ (Color Confidence Quotient) boost it by learning more about the basics.

• Whether you’re creating a warm or cool color scheme, choose one color as the predominant color and use other colors as accent colors.

• If you have a long and narrow room, you can consider painting the end walls a darker shade than the long, narrow walls. The darker colors will recede and will create an illusion of width in this instance. Light colors will advance.

• Solids and simple patterns reduce visual weight, while bold patterns add visual weight.

• Bright and intense colors add visual weight, while muted, neutral colors reduce visual weight.

• To make a small room look larger, choose a light-color paint and select furnishings in the same color family. Or, you can paint some of the furniture to match the walls.

• Light-color ceilings will attract attention, but dark-color ceilings will direct the eye back to head level, allowing the focus to be on the walls, furnishings and accessories in a room.

• Light affects color dramatically. Fluorescent light tends to be cool lighting and brings out more green or blue in a color. Incandescent light — light bulbs — brings more of the red or warmth out in a color. It is important to view colors in daylight or night, because they will appear different.

• The location of color within an interior space can make a great deal of difference in influencing the room's character. A color placed on a ceiling, wall or door may elicit many different reactions.

Did you know that perception of temperature may also be altered with color?

Most design schemes contain more than one color in a space, so if the design includes a color from each group — warm and cool — coordination of the space is still accomplished.

Find just the right colors for your home with the Sherwin-Williams easy-to-use online tool or, better yet, by personally visiting their booth during the Home & Lifestyle Show.

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