HAMMOND — A 65-year-old man wanted on charges alleging he shot and nearly killed his fiancee's son was arrested Wednesday in South Holland, police said.

Kenneth R. Scott, of Hammond, is accused of shooting his fiancee's 37-year-old son during a drunken argument Oct. 6 at the family's home in the 800 block of 174th Place in Hammond.

Officials with the U.S. Marshals Service Great Lakes Regional Task Force took Scott into custody Wednesday in the 500 block of East 173rd Avenue in South Holland, records show.

After Hammond police arrived at the scene on Oct. 6, an officer found the son braced against a wall in the home with a gunshot wound to his right upper thigh, according to Lake Criminal Court records. A long-barrel shotgun was resting against a nearby closet door.

Officer Matt Siegfried used a tourniquet to stop the man's bleeding before he was taken by ambulance to Community Hospital in Munster, police said. A doctor later told police that Siegfried likely saved the man's life by applying the tourniquet.

Siegfried had recently received the tourniquet for his personal use after completing a tactical training program intended to help officers save their own lives or the lives of their partners if shot in the line of duty. The Indiana District 1 Hospital Emergency Planning Committee has been offering the free training to Region police departments as part of the Save a Cop program.

Scott claimed in a statement to police he and his fiance's son got into to a fight while drinking and he got his gun to scare the man, a probable cause affidavit states. He said he did not remember loading the gun or cocking it, and claimed it was as if the gun shot itself, according to the affidavit.

Scott will face extradition proceedings in Illinois before appearing in Lake Criminal Court on charges of aggravated battery, battery by means of a deadly weapon and battery resulting in serious bodily injury.

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Public safety reporter

Sarah covers crime, federal courts and breaking news for The Times. She joined the paper in 2004 after graduating from Purdue University Calumet.