CROWN POINT — A federal grand jury has indicted Eric Krieg on additional charges related to the pipe bomb explosion in September at the U.S. Post Office in East Chicago, according to the U.S. Attorney's Office.

Krieg, 45, of Munster, was indicted by a grand jury in South Bend on Wednesday of making an unregistered destructive device, mailing a destructive device, malicious use of explosive materials, possession of a destructive device in furtherance of a crime of violence and mailing a threatening communication.

Krieg was charged in a criminal complaint Oct. 12 with possession of an explosive device and transporting explosive materials on allegations he attempted to mail a homemade explosive Sept. 6 to a Hammond city attorney.

The pipe bomb exploded at the post office, injuring one postal worker, who was pregnant at the time, the complaint states.

Krieg also allegedly sent a threatening letter and bullet to another city worker, with a message stating: “The next one will be in the back of your head,” according to the complaint.

The target of the pipe bomb had previously represented the brother of Hammond city Mayor Thomas McDermott Jr. in a defamation lawsuit against Krieg, the complaint states.

The threatening letter was allegedly mailed to a city worker who verbally sparred with Krieg in 2013 on an internet forum, the complaint states.

A federal judge ordered Oct. 17 that Krieg, a former BP engineer and occasional political candidate, remain in jail without bond until trial.

“When individuals use dangerous, explosive devices as the means to commit or attempt to commit violent acts, those individuals will be held accountable for their actions,” U.S. Attorney Thomas L. Kirsch II said in a statement Thursday. “We will continue to partner with our Federal, State and Local law enforcement agencies to vigorously investigate and prosecute all manner of violent crime.”

Krieg is scheduled to appear Nov. 20 at an arraignment in U.S. District Court in Hammond.

Defense attorney Kevin Milner did not respond Thursday to a request for comment. 

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Courts and social justice reporter

Steve covers Lake County courts and social justice issues for The Times. The UW-Milwaukee graduate joined The Times in 2016 after reporting on criminal justice in New Mexico and Wisconsin.