GOP senators remind Hoosiers state agencies still open

2013-10-11T19:40:00Z 2013-10-11T22:37:34Z GOP senators remind Hoosiers state agencies still openBy Dan Carden dan.carden@nwi.com, (317) 637-9078 nwitimes.com
October 11, 2013 7:40 pm  • 

INDIANAPOLIS | The day after a national poll found just 24 percent of Americans have a positive opinion of the Republican Party, many GOP state senators sent constituents email reminders that Indiana's government remains open for business.

"State officials are still at work for Hoosiers amid the partial federal government shutdown," their messages said.

The senators noted that state-administered programs funded by the federal government have continued without interruption including the Indiana National Guard, cash and food assistance for low-income mothers and the supplemental nutrition assistance program, also known as food stamps.

The Pence administration expects the state's positive fund balances for those programs can carry them through at least the end of the month, if the shutdown continues.

The Republican governor also pointed to the $2 billion state budget reserve fund as an essential asset given the uncertainty coming out of Washington, D.C.

Northwest Indiana's Republican state senators did not comment on the shutdown in their constituent messages Friday.

But the GOP senators who did urged constituents to contact them if they need assistance navigating problems caused by the federal shutdown.

"Regardless of political viewpoints about the prolonged inaction of federal officials, state leaders are taking steps to assist those affected by furloughs and help our most vulnerable Hoosiers," they said.

An NBC/Wall Street Journal poll released Thursday found a majority of Americans blame Republicans for the federal shutdown, and 70 percent said Republicans were placing politics above the good of the nation.

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