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Indiana Senate

The Senate chamber in the Indiana Statehouse. The Senate Tax and Fiscal Policy Committee changed the mix of taxes and fees in House Bill 1002, sponsored by state Rep. Ed Soliday, R-Valparaiso. But the committee still overwhelmingly agreed, 11-2, to advance the tax-hike proposal to the 50-member chamber.

Doug Ross, The Times

INDIANAPOLIS — For the second year in a row, a House committee has declined to consider Senate-approved legislation prohibiting the abortion of a child expected to be born with Down syndrome, or another genetic disease, defect or disorder.

But that isn't deterring state Sen. Travis Holdman, R-Markle, from trying to enact his proposal into law.

He persuaded the Senate Health Committee Wednesday to add the provisions of his Senate Bill 313 to House Bill 1337, a House-approved measure requiring the burial or cremation of an aborted fetus, instead of disposing of it as medical waste, and forcing abortion doctors to comply with numerous additional paperwork mandates.

Holdman's proposal prohibits doctors from performing an abortion if the doctor knows the patient is seeking an abortion due to a diagnosis, or potential diagnosis, of a genetic fetal disability, or due to the gender, race, color, national origin or ancestry of the fetus.

He said he hopes it reduces the number of Indiana abortions and demonstrates that Hoosiers believe all life has value.

The combined abortion measure was approved by the committee 6-3 and now goes to the Republican-controlled Senate, where it is likely to pass.

If state Rep. Casey Cox, R-Fort Wayne, the co-sponsor, convinces the Republican-controlled House to concur with the Senate change to his legislation it immediately would go to Republican Gov. Mike Pence for his signature or veto.

The House also could send the combined abortion proposal to a conference committee, where lawmakers from both chambers would work to devise a compromise measure that must be re-approved by the House and Senate to go to the governor.

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Dan is Statehouse Bureau Chief for The Times. Since 2009, he's reported on Indiana government and politics — and how both impact the Region — from the state capital in Indianapolis. He originally is from Orland Park, Ill.