Dr. John Read | Aug. 8, 1928 — Jan. 19, 2013

Doctor was committed to patients

2013-04-17T00:00:00Z Doctor was committed to patientsCarrie Rodovich Times Correspondent nwitimes.com
April 17, 2013 12:00 am  • 

Dr. John Read was dedicated to the health and welfare of others, his children said.

“He would interrupt almost anything he was doing for an emergency situation involving the health of another person,” said his son, Bill Read. “Dad would be called away at odd hours by a medical emergency. It was a regular occurrence because people knew that Dad would respond immediately. He saved many lives by his responsiveness to emergency situations.”

Dr. John Read, 84, of Chesterton, died Jan. 19. He was an Army Medical Corps veteran and a member of the Chesterton Masonic Lodge.

He was preceded in death by his wife, Dolores Read, in 2003.

His daughter, Lisa Schiro, said her father was kind-hearted, patient and had a great bedside manner.

“When he was practicing medicine, he seemed to be always on call,” she said. “He made many house calls, especially after hours and on the weekends.”

He went above and beyond what was necessary, said his daughter, MaryBeth Slont.

“One time when a friend and patient of his was critically ill, he flew him to Mayo Clinic in Minnesota and would not accept any payment for doing so,” Slont said.

Dr. Read valued education, and wanted his children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren to receive as much education as possible, his son said.

“He very much wanted us all to get advanced degrees in our chosen field,” Bill Read said. “He used to say, ‘I don’t care if you’re going to be a ditch digger. But if you are, you should be the best ditch digger around.’”

He loved being outdoors, hunting, sailing, fishing, golfing or bird hunting. He valued doing things properly, thinking and talking positively, and being compassionate.

Dr. Read always made time for his children, Schiro said.

“He never wanted any of us to feel left out or have any resentment about the fact that his career choice took him away so often,” she said. “The time we did have together, he made sure it was quality time.”

Slont said her father loved Christmas traditions.

“He would put on his red Santa hat and read the Christmas story with all of (the grandchildren) surrounding him,” she said. “He so enjoyed doing this.”

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