SILAS E. JONES | July 15, 1925 – Feb. 12, 2014

WWII veteran treated all equally

2014-04-19T00:00:00Z WWII veteran treated all equallyBy Diane Poulton Times Correspondent nwitimes.com
April 19, 2014 12:00 am  • 

Hard working World War II veteran Silas E. Jones was fair minded, treating all people equally regardless of their station in life, his daughter Bonita Smulski said.

“His word and a handshake were as good as any signed contract,” Smulski said.

During World War II, Jones served in the U.S. Army stationed in the United States and Italy. He participated in the campaigns in Rome-Arno, Northern Apennines and the Po Valley, receiving the WWII Victory Medal, the Good Conduct Medal, European African Middle Eastern Service Medal with three Bronze Stars and a Purple Heart, she said.

A member of American Legion Hammond Victory Post 168, Jones was proud of his service to his country, Smulski said.

Jones retired from ArcelorMittal after more than 29 years. Jones, 88, of Hammond, started there as a laborer, later becoming an iron worker.

“During his employment, he designed a water cooled door for open hearth furnaces that was used until open hearth furnaces were taken out of use in 1975,” Smulski said. “He liked his job.”

Jones met Agnes, his wife of 65 years who survives, after a ballgame while she was walking home.

“He offered her a ride,” Smulski said. “She refused so he walked her home and they began dating after that.”

Faith was important to Jones who served as a deacon at the Cornerstone Southern Baptist Church. His major hobby was collecting and working on old cars with his sons, Smulski said.

Smulski said her father taught his children several life lessons.

“You can be anything you want to be if you want it bad enough and are willing to work for it,” Smulski said. “Always keep your word and stand up for yourself and your beliefs.”

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