Scholarship application tips

2013-02-11T00:00:00Z 2013-02-11T10:29:03Z Scholarship application tipsFamily Features nwitimes.com
February 11, 2013 12:00 am  • 

The high cost of a college education means that a lot of students are looking for financial aid to help pay for it. But the competition can be stiff. According to the most recent National Postsecondary Student Aid Study, only 5.5 percent of undergraduate students received non-athletic scholarships. What can students do to give themselves the best chance of receiving some much-needed scholarship money?

“Start your search and application process as early as possible,” says Tiffany Turner, Program Manager at International Scholarship and Tuition Services, Inc., who manages 30 scholarship programs including Foresters™ Competitive Scholarship Program2. “Give yourself plenty of time to find scholarships that fit your skills and needs. And most applications will require essays and letters of recommendation, so you want to make sure you have plenty of time to pull those together.”

Turner also encourages students to apply for as many scholarships as they qualify for. “There aren’t a lot of big, full-ride scholarships available, but many smaller scholarships can add up to a surprising amount.”

The Scholarship Application

When applying for scholarships, attention to detail is an important step to success:

• Follow directions carefully. Make sure you have all the supporting materials required, but don’t include anything that is not requested.

• Fill out the entire application. Don’t skip any questions. If one doesn’t apply to you, make a note of that on the application. If you’re not sure how to answer, you can contact the scholarship coordinator.

• Proofread carefully. Typos and grammar errors can hurt your chances. Have a parent or teacher double-check your application.

• Watch all deadlines. Set up a calendar for application deadlines and make sure you meet them. If you miss one, your application won’t be considered.

Many scholarship applications require some kind of written essay or letter.

• Be specific. Focus on the topics the application requires. Use concrete examples rather than vague, general statements.

• Be yourself. This is your chance to show scholarship providers what kind of person you are and why they should help pay for your education. Let your personality come through, and include details that reveal who you really are.

• Be honest. Never exaggerate grades, skills or experience. If you find yourself feeling the need to do so, you’re probably not applying for the right scholarship.

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