Subscribe for 33¢ / day

Pro golf

Glover's wife blames attack on mother-in-law in 911 call: The wife of former U.S. Open champion Lucas Glover made the first call to 911 and claimed she was attacked by her mother-in-law, according to a tape of the call released Wednesday that provided another bizarre twist in the wife's arrest on a domestic violence charge.

Glover answered when the St. John's Sheriff's Office in Florida called back and said his wife was lying.

"Yeah, hi, I think we got our lines crossed here. This is the husband, the sane one of the bunch," Glover says in a calm voice. "My wife has called you. ... Now she's trying to blame it on my mother, which is not the case at all. ... My wife has gone crazy."

Krista Glover was arrested Saturday night and taken to the St. John's County jail. She was released Sunday on a $2,500 bond and faces misdemeanor charges of domestic violence battery and resisting arrest without violence. She has a May 31 court date.

According to the arrest report, Glover told the deputy that his wife yells at him, stating he is a "loser" and other choice words, when he plays poorly in a tournament. Earlier in the day, Glover shot 78 and missed the 54-hole cut at The Players Championship.

Glover also told the deputy his wife had been drinking, according to the report.

Krista Glover told the 911 operator she had been attacked by her mother-in-law, who had locked herself in her room. When asked how she was attacked, Glover's wife hung up and Glover answered when 911 called back.

When asked if the sheriff's office should send a rescue squad, Glover politely said that won't be necessary.

The operator then asked if she could speak to Glover's wife.

"No, you cannot," Glover says. "She's in the house with my daughter. And when deputies get here, they need to talk to the male — that would be me — because these other two are out of their heads at the moment."

When the operator points out that his wife is who called, Glover replied: "Well, she's going to lie to you. That's what I'm telling you. That's why I answered the phone. She's telling lies."

Glover confirmed on Twitter there was an altercation.

Pro football

Bills will retire Thurman Thomas' No. 34 on Oct. 29: The Buffalo Bills plan to retire Hall of Fame running back Thurman Thomas' No. 34 jersey Oct. 29 when they host the New England Patriots.

Thomas will become the third player to have his number retired. The Bills retired quarterback Jim Kelly's No. 12 in 2001 and defensive end Bruce Smith's No. 78 in 2016.

Thomas, a five-time Pro Bowl selection, played for the Bills from 1988-99 and was a part of four straight AFC championship teams. He spent his final season with the Miami Dolphins.

Panthers sign agreement to sell NFL team to David Tepper: The Carolina Panthers are off the market.

The Panthers announced Wednesday they have signed a "definitive agreement" to sell the team to David Tepper, the founder and president of global hedge fund Appaloosa Management.

The deal is subject to NFL approval.

League owners will meet next week in Atlanta, where they are expected to vote on the purchase. Since Tepper already has been vetted by the league as a minority owner of the Pittsburgh Steelers, the approval process is not expected to run into any snags.

The transaction is expected to close in July, the team announced.

Tepper, who has been a minority owner of the Steelers since 2009, said Wednesday in a release that he's thrilled to become the next owner of the Panthers.

"I have learned a great deal about the community and the team over the past several months and look forward to becoming part of the Carolinas," said Tepper, who was born and raised in Pittsburgh. "I want to thank Jerry Richardson and the other Panthers partners for all they have done to establish and develop the NFL in the Carolinas. It has been a remarkable 25-year journey and I promise to build upon the Panthers' success on the field and in the community."

College

Former Southeastern Conference Commissioner Slive dies at 77: Mike Slive, the former Southeastern Conference commissioner who guided the league to unprecedented success and prosperity, died Wednesday. He was 77.

The Southeastern Conference said Slive died in Birmingham, Alabama, where he lived with his wife of 49 years, Liz. The conference didn't provide the cause of death.

Slive retired in 2015 after 13 years as commissioner. He was battling prostate cancer at the time he stepped down.

0
0
0
0
0

Sports reporter

Steve has won awards during two different stints at The Times. In addition to being the Prep Beat columnist, he covers football, boys basketball and boys track. He is a long-suffering Cubs fan.