Heropop123

  1. For all of you that do not read all the comments this should clarify what we are dealing with here. Bodily harm is not needed to constitute a battery!!!!!

    The following elements must be proven to establish a case for battery: (1) an act by a defendant; (2) an intent to cause harmful or offensive contact on the part of the defendant; and (3) harmful or offensive contact to the plaintiff.

    The Act The act must result in one of two forms of contact. Causing any physical harm or injury to the victim—such as a cut, a burn, or a bullet wound—could constitute battery, but actual injury is not required. Even though there is no apparent bruise following harmful contact, the defendant can still be guilty of battery; occurrence of a physical illness subsequent to the contact may also be actionable. The second type of contact that may constitute battery causes no actual physical harm but is, instead, offensive or insulting to the victim. Examples include spitting in someone's face or offensively touching someone against his or her will.

    Touching the person of someone is defined as including not only contacts with the body, but also with anything closely connected with the body, such as clothing or an item carried in the person's hand. For example, a battery may be committed by intentionally knocking a hat off someone's head or knocking a glass out of some-one's hand.
    February 13, 2013 4:33 pm on Highland town official charged with battery of ex-employee
  2. Your point has nothing to do with this article. If the employee was sleeping or not is not the point here. The point is a law was broken and it was done by a person in a position of power. I have included the definition to clarify for all of you that are not clear on what a battery is.
    The following elements must be proven to establish a case for battery: (1) an act by a defendant; (2) an intent to cause harmful or offensive contact on the part of the defendant; and (3) harmful or offensive contact to the plaintiff.

    The Act The act must result in one of two forms of contact. Causing any physical harm or injury to the victim—such as a cut, a burn, or a bullet wound—could constitute battery, but actual injury is not required. Even though there is no apparent bruise following harmful contact, the defendant can still be guilty of battery; occurrence of a physical illness subsequent to the contact may also be actionable. The second type of contact that may constitute battery causes no actual physical harm but is, instead, offensive or insulting to the victim. Examples include spitting in someone's face or offensively touching someone against his or her will.

    Touching the person of someone is defined as including not only contacts with the body, but also with anything closely connected with the body, such as clothing or an item carried in the person's hand. For example, a battery may be committed by intentionally knocking a hat off someone's head or knocking a glass out of some-one's hand.
    February 13, 2013 4:28 pm on Highland town official charged with battery of ex-employee
  3. Yet another person abusing there position of power. Good luck trying to find a new job with a battery on your record! Robert seems you need to control your emotions. the world is not yours to walk around stepping on ones you think are beneath you. This council needs to wipe this shame off the face of this town and go after a person that has real value. I wonder how the human resource department is handling this?
    February 12, 2013 11:39 pm on Highland town official charged with battery of ex-employee
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