{{featured_button_text}}
Indiana ranks 14th on CNBC's Top States for Businesses

The flags of the United States and the state of Indiana fly over the copper dome on the Indiana Statehouse in Indianapolis. Indiana ranked 14th on CNBC's annual Top States for Businesses.

Indiana ranked 14th nationally in CNBC's America’s Top States for Business, an annual ranking that's based on 66 different measures of competitiveness.

The Hoosier state ranked second nationally in cost of doing business and cost of living and third in infrastructure, according to the cable business news channel. Indiana placed eighth in business friendliness and 10th in economy, but did not fare as well in other categories.

Indiana finished 24th in access to capital, 26th in technology and innovation, 29th in education, 35th in workforce and 45th in quality of life.

CNBC, a financial news network that reaches 785 million homes worldwide, ranked Indiana as the fourth-best state for business in the Midwest, after Minnesota, Nebraska and Michigan.

Keep reading for FREE!
Enjoy more articles by signing up or logging in. No credit card required.

Washington placed first nationwide after its economy grew 3.7 percent last year, saw a 2.9-percent increase in jobs and had one of the hottest housing markets in the county.

“Washington has assembled an amazing roster of both household business names and rising stars to position itself as a powerhouse for some time to come. But the state faces some substantial challenges. How it meets them will determine whether this is just the start of a long period of business dominance, or if this is the peak,” CNBC Special Correspondent Scott Cohn said.

Georgia, Minnesota, Texas and North Carolina rounded out the top five, which are ranked according to metrics that state economic development agencies use in their marketing materials.

0
0
0
0
0

Business Reporter

Joseph S. Pete is a Lisagor Award-winning business reporter who covers steel, industry, unions, the ports, retail, banking and more. The Indiana University grad has been with The Times since 2013 and blogs about craft beer, culture and the military.