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VALPARAISO | Consumers may not consider peanut butter an exciting treat, but most world likely change their minds once they’ve tasted the types sold by B Nutty, said its producers .

“We have found that if people taste it, that’s normally the selling point,” said Lisa Stanford, of Crown Point, a teacher who co-owns B. Nutty with Joy Thompkins. Thompkins is a retired midwife who resides in Valparaiso. “Two out of three people who taste it fall in love with it.”

The product come in six varieties, each using all natural peanut butter as a base and adding a wide range of ingredient.

For example “Dream Big,” contains white chocolate pretzels in the honey roaster peanut butter; “Happy Trails Mix,” is a combination of flax seed, chocolate chips, raisins and split peanuts in honey roasted peanut butter; while “Joy to the World” has dark chocolate, white chocolate and dried cranberries in honey roasted peanut butter.

Other varieties include ”So Happy Together Snickerdoodle,” “Go Lucky Chocolate Toffee” and “Keep Smunchy.” New flavors currently are being developed.

The two women began producing and selling the specialty spreads in April, using recipes developed by John Weed of Indianapolis, who they call a co-partner.

“He’s a college friend of Joy’s and a family man who came up with the recipes to teach his children about business,” Stanford said. “She and I have been friends for years. Joy wanted to produce it and was looking for a partner. I tasted it, fell in love with it and we decided to go into business together. That was last November.”

It took five months for the two women to devise a business strategy, raise the capital – about $40,000 – and procure the space, equipment and supplies to begin producing their peanut butter products. The money came from savings and from a private backer.

“We went to Weed and he gave us exact instructions on how to do it,” Stanford said. “We bought the machines we needed to make the peanut butter. We start with whole peanuts.”

With the help of their husbands, Thompkins' two children and Sanford’s six, the women produce their products in space they rent in Nana Clare’s Commercial Kitchen in Valparaiso.

“We produce it,” Stanford said. “We jar it. We label it. We do everything. I make it in small patches, four jars at a time. In a night, we can make 350 jars.”

Even though the products were only available online and through fundraisers, by mid-July 1,500 of the 12-ounce jars have been sold. They currently have a verbal agreement with Whole Foods to sell their products in its stores. Plus, the women are hoping to sell the butters at local farmer’s markets and are actively pursuing other ways to distribute and sell them.

“We’re hoping to get it into more markets, larger retails stores and venues,” Stanford said. “We’re sending packages to companies to get them interested.”

By the end of this year or next the partners hope to get earn enough to get back their investment, Stanford said. They want to do that, but also claim the business is more than a way to make money.

“It’s teaching our children about business and what it takes to make it a success,” said Stanford. “It’s a family learning lesson.”

VALPARAISO | Consumers may not consider peanut butter an exciting treat, but most world likely change their minds once they’ve tasted the types sold by B Nutty, said its producers .

“We have found that if people taste it, that’s normally the selling point,” said Lisa Stanford, of Crown Point, a teacher who co-owns B. Nutty with Joy Thompkins. Thompkins is a retired midwife who resides in Valparaiso. “Two out of three people who taste it fall in love with it.”

The product come in six varieties, each using all natural peanut butter as a base and adding a wide range of ingredient.

For example “Dream Big,” contains white chocolate pretzels in the honey roaster peanut butter; “Happy Trails Mix,” is a combination of flax seed, chocolate chips, raisins and split peanuts in honey roasted peanut butter; while “Joy to the World” has dark chocolate, white chocolate and dried cranberries in honey roasted peanut butter.

Other varieties include ”So Happy Together Snickerdoodle,” “Go Lucky Chocolate Toffee” and “Keep Smunchy.” New flavors currently are being developed.

The two women began producing and selling the specialty spreads in April, using recipes developed by John Weed of Indianapolis, who they call a co-partner.

“He’s a college friend of Joy’s and a family man who came up with the recipes to teach his children about business,” Stanford said. “She and I have been friends for years. Joy wanted to produce it and was looking for a partner. I tasted it, fell in love with it and we decided to go into business together. That was last November.”

It took five months for the two women to devise a business strategy, raise the capital – about $40,000 – and procure the space, equipment and supplies to begin producing their peanut butter products. The money came from savings and from a private backer.

“We went to Weed and he gave us exact instructions on how to do it,” Stanford said. “We bought the machines we needed to make the peanut butter. We start with whole peanuts.”

With the help of their husbands, Thompkins' two children and Sanford’s six, the women produce their products in space they rent in Nana Clare’s Commercial Kitchen in Valparaiso.

“We produce it,” Stanford said. “We jar it. We label it. We do everything. I make it in small patches, four jars at a time. In a night, we can make 350 jars.”

Even though the products were only available online and through fundraisers, by mid-July 1,500 of the 12-ounce jars have been sold. They currently have a verbal agreement with Whole Foods to sell their products in its stores. Plus, the women are hoping to sell the butters at local farmer’s markets and are actively pursuing other ways to distribute and sell them.

“We’re hoping to get it into more markets, larger retails stores and venues,” Stanford said. “We’re sending packages to companies to get them interested.”

By the end of this year or next the partners hope to get earn enough to get back their investment, Stanford said. They want to do that, but also claim the business is more than a way to make money.

“It’s teaching our children about business and what it takes to make it a success,” said Stanford. “It’s a family learning lesson.”

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