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U.S. Steel records OSHA Days Award injury rate seven times lower than average in 2019

U.S. Steel's Gary Works entrance is shown.

U.S. Steel finished 2019 with an Occupational Safety and Health Administration Days Away rate of 0.10, which was seven times better than the domestic steel industry average, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. 

“U.S. Steel coined the term ‘Safety First’ in 1912, and safety remains our primary core value today. Every employee who works in one of our facilities has the right to return home safely at the end of every day, and I am grateful to all of our employees for the extraordinary safety performance in 2019,” U.S. Steel President and CEO David Burritt said. “I would like to thank the United Steelworkers for their leadership in this effort, which brings us ever closer to achieving our ultimate goal of zero injuries company-wide.”

The Pittsburgh-based steelmaker's Tubular Operations and U.S. Steel Košice both had zero Days Away from Work injury cases recorded last year. The company's total OSHA Recordable injury rate was nearly three times better than the overall industry average of 2.7.

“We are proud to partner with U.S. Steel to ensure that every steelworker has the safe workplace they deserve,” United Steelworkers President Thomas Conway said. “The company’s 2019 safety record proves that the cooperative efforts of the USW and U.S. Steel are working, and we hope to continue this positive trajectory in 2020 and for years to come.”

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Business Reporter

Joseph S. Pete is a Lisagor Award-winning business reporter who covers steel, industry, unions, the ports, retail, banking and more. The Indiana University grad has been with The Times since 2013 and blogs about craft beer, culture and the military.