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Lana Del Ray had 'exhausted' her sound before writing Video Games
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Lana Del Rey had "exhausted" her "bigger sounds" and came close to calling it quits before releasing her 2011 hit 'Video Games'.

The 'Doin' Time' singer has opened up about the creatively challenging time she had before finding her "own style" on the single from her second studio album, 'Born to Die'.

She told the latest issue of Q magazine: "I was at the tail end of 600 days of writing in London, back-to-back days, with about 111 writers.

"I was writing for others too.

"I wasn't really sure what I was doing, I'd kind of exhausted my bigger sounds.

"I was at the point where I had written in every style but my own.

"Now I had."

The track was named Song of the Decade at the Q Awards last week, and Lana admitted it was "unreal" to be recognised with the special accolade.

In a video message screened at the ceremony in London, she said: "I'm so honoured. This is unreal.

"I just can't tell you how much this means.

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"I got my start in London so I wish I could be there, but I'm there in spirit."

The 34-year-old star has certainly found her niche and has never been more prolific.

Shortly after releasing her album 'Norman F***ing Rockwell' in August, Lana announced she will release another new record, 'White Hot Forever', in 2020.

She said: "I've already written parts of it.

"It's called 'White Hot Forever'.

"I feel like it probably will be a surprise release sometime within the next 12 or 13 months.

"I'm really excited right now. I don't want to take a break."

Meanwhile, the 'Cinnamon Girl' singer also discussed the wave of honest artists coming through, like 17-year-old pop phenomenon Billie Eilish, who aren't afraid to sing about sadness, and admitted she feels she paved the way for modern pop stars who have "a little bit more thoughtfulness" in their lyrics.

She said: "She's so sweet and very prodigious.

"The culture is catching up to how people really are. People aren't always cheerful 24/7. They have losses and things they go through things. I like to think I had a part in it, in opening that door for a little bit more . . . thoughtfulness."

This article originally ran on celebretainment.com.

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