What are the most and least energy-efficient states?
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What are the most and least energy-efficient states?

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With the U.S. Department of Energy estimating families could save up to 25% on utilities with energy efficient measures, the personal-finance website WalletHub released its report on 2019’s Most & Least Energy-Efficient States as well as accompanying videos.

To gauge the financial impact of doing more with less energy — the average American household spends at least $2,000 per year on utilities and another $2,109 on motor fuel and oil — WalletHub compared the auto- and home-energy efficiency in 48 U.S. states. Due to data limitations, Alaska and Hawaii were excluded from our analysis.

Most Energy-Efficient States

1 New York 

2 Rhode Island 

3 Utah 

4 Massachusetts 

5 Vermont 

6 California

7 Colorado 

8 Minnesota

9 Wisconsin

10 Connecticut

Least Energy-Efficient States

39 Oklahoma

40 Kentucky

41 Texas

42 Georgia

43 Mississippi

44 Arkansas

45 Tennessee

46 Alabama

47 Louisiana

48 South Carolina

Source: WalletHub

To view the full report and your state’s ranking, please visit: https://wallethub.com/edu/most-and-least-energy-efficient-states/7354/

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