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Hobart woman may have fed dismembered lover to neighbors at barbecue, been serial killer, according to documentary

"Dead North" follows former Iron River police chief Laura Frizzo as she investigates a missing persons case.

A forthcoming documentary suggests a Hobart woman who's serving a life sentence in prison for her role in two killings may have been a serial killer who also fed the remains of her dismembered lover to neighbors at a barbecue in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.

Investigation Discovery, a crime-themed cable network that reaches 85 million U.S. households, will air the true crime thriller "Dead North" about Kelly Cochran, a Northwest Indiana woman who pleaded guilty to the 2016 murder of her husband, Jason Cochran, at their home on the 7100 block of Mississippi Street of Hobart. 

Cochran told Hobart police she injected her husband with heroin and smothered him with a pillow as revenge for the murder of her lover Christopher Regan, who she lured to her other home in Iron River, Michigan, with the promise of sex. Her husband burst out of the basement and shot Regan in the head with a .22 caliber rifle during the act, which the couple had plotted after making a "pact to kill off anyone involved in extramarital affairs," according to the documentary.

"Dead North" reveals that former Iron River police chief Laura Frizzo investigated whether Kelly Cochran had as many as nine victims.

The upcoming show follows Frizzo as her investigation of missing person Regan leads her "down a rabbit hole that alludes to cannibalism, reveals human remains and uncovers a deadly love triangle," according to Investigation Discovery.

"Investigation Discovery, at the core, tells real stories about real people who are looking for justice. The search for Chris Regan — and specifically Laura Frizzo's determination to solve this case — is what compelled us to join her on this journey for answers," said Henry Schleiff, Group President of Investigation Discovery, Travel Channel, American Heroes Channel and Destination America. "The story that unfolds through Chief Frizzo's own video documentations is a rare opportunity for viewers to see a skilled investigator at work."

Investigation Discovery compares "Dead North," which premiers in a "two-night event" at 9 p.m. May 28 and May 29, to the Coen brothers classic "Fargo," also a murder mystery set in the far reaches of the upper Midwest. The documentary show that was produced by Magilla Entertainment features extensive use of police bodycam footage and tape of interrogation room interviews showing how Frizzo worked to track down Regan in the desolate Upper Peninsula.

The case goes cold but breaks open after Jason Cochran's murder in Hobart in February 2016, which Kelly Cochran told Hobart police she "did not lose a moment of sleep over" and "was revenge, I evened the score," according to a probable cause affidavit.

While being interrogated, Kelly Cochran admitted she and her husband plotted to kill Regan and that they dismembered his corpse and dumped it in the woods. She led Frizzo to an area where his skull was found in the woods, and "her neighbors reveal they were potentially served his remains at a barbecue." She was sentenced to life in prison for Regan's killing in 2017, and then sentenced in April to 65 years in prison for her husband's murder.

"Amidst these convictions, Kelly's own brother, Colton Gaboyan, comes forth fearing his sister is a serial killer with nine total victims," Investigation Discovery said in a press release.

But as Frizzo continued her investigation, the Iron River City Manager fired her because he saw "her management style and professional standards and practices as irreconcilable with his own," according to the Iron River Daily News, prompting her to sue to get her job back last year.

"The city manager relieves Frizzo of her duties just as Kelly admits to having other 'friends' buried in Indiana, Michigan, Tennessee and Minnesota; however, the identities and specific locations of these bodies remain a mystery to this day," Investigation Discovery said in the press release.

If the allegations prove true, Northwest Indiana would have had two serial killers — Kelly Cochran and Darren Vann, who pleaded guilty to the murders of seven women — active around the same time.

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Business Reporter

Joseph S. Pete is a Lisagor Award-winning business reporter who covers steel, industry, unions, the ports, retail, banking and more. The Indiana University grad has been with The Times since 2013 and blogs about craft beer, culture and the military.