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INDIANAPOLIS — Hoosiers who take intimate photographs soon may have new remedies if their partner distributes the images without consent as a form of revenge or harassment.

The Indiana Senate voted 47-1 Tuesday to approve Senate Bill 192 authorizing victims of "revenge porn," also known as nonconsensual pornography, to seek civil damages from any person who causes them harm by distributing an intimate image.

Specifically, a revenge porn victim would be permitted to sue a person who creates or obtains an intimate image that the person knows or should know was intended to remain private, acquires such an image through false pretenses or via computer hacking.

The perpetrator also would have to disclose the image with the intent to harass, intimidate, threaten, coerce, embarrass, profit at the expense of, or cause physical injury or emotional distress to the subject of the image, who must be identifiable and not have consented to the release of the photograph to a third-party.

An intimate image is defined in the proposal as a photograph, digital image or video of a person engaged in penetrative sexual relations or displaying uncovered buttocks, genitals or female breasts.

The sponsor of the legislation, state Sen. Mike Bohacek, R-Michiana Shores, said he hopes any person considering distributing nonconsensual pornography will think twice if he or she is going to get slapped with a lawsuit for actual, statutory and unlimited punitive damages.

"Unfortunately, in these times, with the availability of camera phones and what have you, we have folks that take intimate pictures of others, whether it be a trusted loved one or a complete stranger, and use those images to intimidate, coerce, harass and otherwise belittle the other person when either a relationship ends or things just don't go right," Bohacek said.

His measure now goes to the House, where representatives separately are considering House Bill 1333 making the distribution of revenge porn a Class A misdemeanor, punishable by up to one year in jail and a $5,000 fine.

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Statehouse Bureau Chief

Dan is Statehouse Bureau Chief for The Times. Since 2009, he's reported on Indiana government and politics — and how both impact the Region — from the state capital in Indianapolis. He originally is from Orland Park, Ill.