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STOCK_Welcome to Lowell

STOCK_Welcome to Lowell

LOWELL — The Town Council is continuing to review its hunting ordinance after residents of Timber Springs subdivision and nearby neighborhoods brought their concerns over a person bow hunting near their homes to the council last month.

While the man reportedly is no longer hunting for deer with a bow on 5 wooded acres within the town's boundaries, the council wants to be certain the concerns of residents are addressed and citizens feel safe.

Council President Chris Salatas, R-4th, said Monday he has hunted, but wouldn't consider doing it in an urban area. "I don't think someone moving into a municipality should expect to hunt," he said.

Police Chief Erik Matson said the man had permission from the property owner to hunt on his 5 acres, all of which are inside the town limits.

The town's current ordinance prohibits pointing, aiming, firing or shooting among a list of items that would include a bow and arrow.

Councilwoman LeAnn Angerman, R-2nd, said she would like to look at criminal recklessness as an answer rather than change the ordinance.

While town attorney David Westland pointed out he is not a criminal attorney, he researched the definition of criminal recklessness during Monday's meeting, and it appeared the charge might be a way to deal with hunters in the town.

Salatas pointed out Lowell is not alone in struggling to find a legal solution. Winfield also is dealing with the issue, he said.

The council also:

* Approved the new special events ordinance that comes with a $100 permit fee. The fee can be waived by the Lowell town manager, but the permit is necessary to be certain those holding the events meet certain criteria including noise and security rules.

* Continued discussing the water meter ordinance drafted in June. Talks were hampered by the absences of the town manager and public works director; however, the council learned the town began its water meter replacement program in 2009 with meters that no longer would require examining each meter.

At the same time, the batteries on older meters are failing, and two individuals plus about 10 businesses are not allowing the new meters to be installed. "Their several years of noncompliance must be considered," Angerman said.

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