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CROWN POINT — A Lake Superior judge froze the assets of a former Gary worker who is accused of misappropriating city funds as part of a scheme involving nearly 900 iPad Air tablets. 

Monique S. Bowling-Boyd, of Merrillville, appeared Tuesday in front of Lake Superior Judge Diane Kavadias Schnieder days after the Indiana attorney general's office filed a civil lawsuit seeking she pay Gary nearly $1.4 million plus damages.

Bowling-Boyd did not have an attorney with her during the hearing, but she told Kavadias Schnieder that she intends to hire one. 

Jacob Butz, deputy attorney general, said in court the state was seeking the preliminary injunction, because Bowling-Boyd has already sold this past year some vehicles she owned.

He said Bowling-Boyd has other vehicles she could sell, which could hamper their intentions of recovering the funds.

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"The state feels it will be harmed if she dissipates her assets," he said.

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The state's lawsuit stems from a State Board of Accounts report issued in October that determined Bowling-Boyd owed Gary $1.37 million and the state $29,818 for its investigative costs. The state is also seeking treble damages in the amount of $4.1 million, court costs and attorney fees. 

The attorney general's office last week accused Bowling-Boyd of misappropriating the funds from Jan. 1, 2012, to May 12, 2015, by falsifying or duplicating invoices for computer equipment and drawing funds from six city accounts. Most of the electronics were Apple products, but some of the money was used to purchase non-Apple products. 

Kavadias Schnieder granted the state's motion and told Bowling-Boyd she couldn't sell, transfer or put any liens on any property she owned. She can still use the property. 

The case was scheduled for a March 8 status hearing.

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