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Indiana officials confirm first human case of Zika virus

FILE - This 2006 file photo provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows a female Aedes aegypti mosquito, which transmits the Zika virus, in the process of acquiring a blood meal from a human host. (James Gathany/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention via AP, File)

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. — A wet spring and dangerous flooding have created a nasty byproduct — more mosquitoes.

The Illinois Department of Public Health said Monday that the flooding has made conditions ripe for floodwater mosquitoes. They're also known as nuisance mosquitoes and don't carry disease like other types.

Dr. Ngozi Ezike is director of public health. She says it's always important to be protected from mosquito bites.

She says mosquitoes that carry West Nile Virus prefer hot, dry conditions. But nuisance mosquitoes that flourish in wet weather can still pose a threat. A bite from one of them can become infected if it is scratched and becomes a wound.

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Precautions include avoiding outdoors between dusk and dawn, wearing light clothing over all exposed skin and using approved repellant.

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