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University of Illinois administrators seek a tuition hike

University of Illinois administrators seek a tuition hike

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The University of Illinois (CUTS)

The University of Illinois campus.

CHICAGO — University of Illinois administrators are recommending a hike in tuition costs for in-state freshmen for the first time in six years, officials announced Wednesday.

Under the recommendation, freshmen entering the university for the 2020-21 academic year would pay 1.8% more to attend the Urbana-Champaign and Chicago campuses, and 1% more to attend the Springfield campus. In a statement, the university says the proposed tuition hike will strengthen efforts to attract and retain faculty across the University of Illinois system in response to record-high enrollment.

If approved Thursday by trustees, the base tuition for in-state undergraduates would rise $218 to $12,254 a year for enrollees in Urbana-Champaign, by $192 to $10,776 a year for enrollees in Chicago and by $97.50 to $9,502.50 for enrollees in Springfield. Tuition for some graduate, professional and online programs would increase by up to 2 percent at all three campuses.

Administrators have also recommended an increase in student fees and housing rates. In Urbana, fees would increase $76 to $3,162 per year, and Chicago’s fees would rise $32, to $3,340 per year. In Springfield, fees would be unchanged at $2,426 a year.

University President Tim Killeen says the proposed increases adhere to a commitment to affordability and accessibility.

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