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Hawaii Gov. David Ige has signed legislation providing freedom of speech and freedom of press protections to students publishing school-sponsored media at Hawaii public schools and the University of Hawaii. The “Hawaii Student Journalism Protection Act” also protects advisers from retaliation for refusing to infringe upon student press freedom. Ige says providing student journalists with the same protections that exist for them in the industry gives them real-world opportunities. He says it provides them a more enhanced laboratory for democracy and learning. Supporters of the measure say similar laws exist in 15 other states.

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The man accused of opening fire on a Southern California church congregation because of his political hatred for Taiwan sent a newspaper a seven-volume diary before the attack. The Chinese-language World Journal bureau in the Los Angeles area said it received the stacks of photocopied pages and a flash drive on Monday — a day after authorities say David Chou opened fire on people at a luncheon at a Taiwanese church in Laguna Woods. The paper said the title referred to a “destroying" angel opposed to Taiwan's independence from China. The newspaper's attorney tells The Orange County Register he will turn them over over to police when he receives a subpoena. Chou is charged with murder and attempted murder.

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The man accused of opening fire on a Southern California church congregation of mainly elderly people because of his political hatred for Taiwan sent a newspaper a seven-volume diary before the attack. The Chinese-language World Journal bureau in the Los Angeles area said it received the stacks of photocopied pages and a flash drive on Monday — a day after David Chou allegedly opened fire on people at a luncheon at a Taiwanese church in Laguna Woods. The paper didn't report details of what was in the handwritten Chinese pages but the title referred to a “destroying angel" opposed to Taiwan's independence from China. The documents were turned over to police. Chou is charged with killing one man and wounding seven other people. He has not yet entered a plea.

Chicago's famed alt-weekly is expected to become a nonprofit this month after the sale was nearly derailed over a co-owner’s column opposing COVID-19 vaccine requirements for children. The Chicago Reader's sale was on track to be sold to the new nonprofit last year until the November printing of defense attorney Leonard Goodman’s column headlined “Vaxxing our kids” prompted allegations of misinformation and censorship. Goodman agreed to step aside in late April, allowing the sale to go through. Still, the standoff among the alt-weekly’s managers left staff members in limbo for months, wondering if the Reader would be shut down.

Longtime news executive Richard Wald has died at age 92 after suffering a stroke this week. Wald was a former NBC News president who also helped build ABC News into a powerhouse through the 1980s and 1990s with mercurial boss Roone Arledge. He worked at newspapers, two of them now defunct, before turning to television, saying “I didn’t leave newspapers. Newspapers left me.” He's credited with giving a name to ABC's “Nightline” and was the model for the network news executive in the movie “Network.” Wald also taught journalism at his alma mater, Columbia University and worked with the Pulitzer, duPont and Peabody awards.

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Dean Fosdick, the journalist with The Associated Press who filed the news alert informing the world of the Exxon Valdez grounding, has died. Fosdick died April 27 in Florida. He was 80. His long career with the news service included 15 years as the bureau chief in Alaska. He began his career with the AP in the Nashville, Tennessee, bureau in 1978, and became the head of the Alaska bureau in 1985. Jim Clarke, who is now AP's managing director of local markets, was hired by Fosdick in 1993. Clarke says Fosdick was a steady force in Alaska journalism for more than a decade.

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A veteran Al Jazeera correspondent who was shot dead while reporting on an Israeli raid in the West Bank was a highly respected and familiar face in the Middle East. Shireen Abu Akleh’s death reverberated across the region and set social media alight. Her unflinching coverage of the harsh realities of Israel’s military occupation was inextricably linked with her own identity as a Palestinian journalist on the front lines. Since 1997, the 51-year-old journalist had reported on forced home evictions, the killings of unarmed Palestinian youth, hundreds of Palestinians held without charge in Israeli prisons and expansion of Jewish settlements. Her death Wednesday underscores the heavy price the conflict continues to exact on Palestinians.

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USA Today sports writer/columnist Jarrett Bell has won the Bill Nunn Jr. Award for journalistic contributions while covering pro football. Bell, who has covered the NFL since 1981 and has been with USA Today since 1993, was selected by the Professional Football Writers of America. He is the 54th award winner and the first Black journalist to receive the honor for a long and distinguished career covering the sport. The award is named for Nunn, who before his Hall of Fame scouting career with the Pittsburgh Steelers worked for 22 years at the Pittsburgh Courier, one of the most influential Black publications in the United States. 

A former Indiana official had been set to take a job leading Virginia’s Department of Motor Vehicles. But a spokeswoman for Gov. Glenn Youngkin confirms that fell apart Tuesday, after a newspaper’s reporting about allegations that the official had behaved inappropriately at work. Spokeswoman Macaulay Porter said Virginia Transportation Secretary Shep Miller spoke with former Indiana Bureau of Motor Vehicles Commissioner Peter Lacy on Tuesday morning. She said Lacy rescinded his acceptance and Miller rescinded the offer. Lacy could not immediately be reached for comment by The Associated Press. Virginia’s former DMV commissioner retired before Youngkin took office in January.  

Joshua Cohen’s “The Netanyahus,” a comic and rigorous campus novel based on the true story of the father of former Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu seeking a job in academia, has won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction. Many of the winners in the arts Monday were explorations of race and class, in the past and the present.James Ijames’ “Fat Ham,” an adaptation of Shakespeare’s “Hamlet” set at a Black family’s barbecue in the modern South, received the Pulitzer for drama. The late artist Winfred Rembert won in biography for “Chasing Me to My Grave," as told to Erin I. Kelly.

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A Reuters photographer who was killed while covering fighting in Afghanistan was part of a team that took home the Pulitzer for feature photography. Danish Siddiqui and his colleagues Adnan Abidi, Sanna Irshad Mattoo and Amit Dave won for images depicting the toll of the COVID-19 pandemic in India. Their work, which was moved from the breaking photography category by the judges, “balanced intimacy and devastation, while offering viewers a heightened sense of place,” the committee wrote. Siddiqui had been embedded with Afghan special forces in July and was killed as the commando unit battled for control of a crossing on the border between southern Afghanistan and Pakistan.

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The Washington Post won the Pulitzer Prize in public service journalism Monday for its coverage of the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol, an attack on democracy that was a shocking start to a tumultuous year that also saw the end of the United States’ longest war, in Afghanistan. The Post’s extensive reporting was published in a sophisticated interactive series and found numerous problems and failures in political systems and security before, during and after the Jan. 6, 2021, riot in the newspaper’s own backyard. The U.S. pullout and resurrection of the Taliban’s grip on Afghanistan permeated across categories and Ukrainian journalists were awarded a special citation.

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News organizations are using sophisticated new technologies to transform the way they conduct investigations. Much of it is publicly available, or “open-source” material from mobile phones, satellite images and security cameras, but it also extends to computer modeling and artificial intelligence. A reporting form that barely existed a decade ago is becoming an important part of journalism's future. The New York Times, which has sent part of its open source team to Ukraine to supplement traditional reporters, is a leader in the field. The Washington Post just announced that it was adding six people to its video forensics team, doubling its size.

There’s nothing official Washington loves better than a juicy whodunit. And the mystery over who leaked the Supreme Court’s draft opinion in a landmark abortion case offers the added subplot of tantalizing questions about why the leaker did it. It’s an intrigue in the tradition of Watergate’s “Deep Throat” or the Trump-era whistleblower “Anonymous.” The hunt for the high court leaker is afoot. Chief Justice John Roberts has ordered an investigation into what he called an “egregious breach of trust.” And amateur sleuths have been eagerly trading theories on social media. One way or another, big secrets in Washington have a way of eventually coming out.

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The State Department says Secretary of State Antony Blinken has tested positive for COVID-19 after attending the White House Correspondents' Dinner and related events over the weekend. Spokesman Ned Price says Blinken tested positive with a PCR test on Wednesday afternoon. Price says Blinken is fully vaccinated and is experiencing only mild symptoms. Blinken tested negative Tuesday and again earlier Wednesday morning with antigen tests but took the PCR test after developing symptoms . The White House and State Department said Blinken has not met in person with President Joe Biden for “several days” and is not considered a close contact of the president.

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Politico boosted security and warned its staff members to take extra care online following the news organization's major scoop in publishing a Supreme Court draft decision that would strike down the Roe v. Wade precedent for abortion rights. The news organization says it has restricted access to its offices. While the company hasn't reported specific threats, its story was already the subject of rampant speculation — some of it malevolent — about its sources. The 15-year-old Politico is a well-known brand name for those who closely follow news of politics and government, and its scoop left organizations with bigger public footprints chasing it.

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Football great Herschel Walker has gone to great lengths to dodge tough questions during his run for the U.S. Senate in Georgia. The GOP candidate does not widely publicize his campaign stops and limits his appearances mostly to conservative news outlets and friendly audiences. Walker recently skipped the first debate for the May 24 Republican primary and is expected to miss another debate Tuesday. Political experts say it may be a wise choice for the gaffe-prone GOP front-runner. But Walker’s Republican rivals have seized on his absence to raise doubts about his fitness to take on Democrat Raphael Warnock in November should he win the Republican primary.

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President Joe Biden took the White House press corps' annual gala as an opportunity to make light of the criticism he has faced in his 15 months in office. He also aimed a few barbs at his predecessor and the Republican Party. The White House Correspondents' Association dinner Saturday night ended a two-year pandemic-related hiatus even as the threat of COVID-19 loomed. Biden cracked, “Just imagine if my predecessor came to this dinner this year. Now that would really have been a real coup.” Biden also said he was happy to be with the only group of Americans with a lower approval rating than he has.

The New York Times has usually been content to let its journalism speak for itself. New executive editor Joe Kahn is about to find out if that will be enough in an era of polarization and disinformation. The Times veteran, who has been the top deputy to current chief Dean Baquet for five years, will soon take over the most high-profile job in journalism. He has thoughts about how The Times can fight for democracy and against disinformation, as well as continuing the organization's remarkable transformation under eight years of Baquet's leadership. Despite his insider status, Kahn said his elevation shouldn't be seen as a sign of business as usual.

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The Los Angeles County sheriff disputed allegations he orchestrated the cover-up of an incident where a deputy knelt on a handcuffed inmate’s head for more than three minutes. Sheriff Alex Villanueva also indicated Tuesday that a Los Angeles Times reporter is under criminal investigation after she first reported the incident last month and the newspaper published a leaked video showing the incident. The sheriff later clarified that the agency is not pursuing criminal charges against any reporters. The paper’s top editor condemned Villanueva’s remarks. The inmate received minor injuries in last year's incident, which occurred after he punched a deputy. The inmate has been charged with resisting an officer. The deputy's actions are still being investigated.

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