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MLB chief baseball officer Joe Torre says discipline is obviously coming for those involved in Sunday's melee between the Toronto Blue Jays and Texas Rangers, "hopefully" as soon as Tuesday.

At a news conference Monday before the Arizona Diamondbacks-New York Yankees game, Torre said of the punch that the Rangers' Roughned Odor connected with the jaw of Toronto's Jose Bautista, "it certainly wasn't pretty and I hate seeing that stuff."

Torre said it's tough enough staying healthy in baseball without contributing to an incident that "could keep you out of the ball game or end your career."

Torre said he would meet Monday night with Joe Garagiola Jr. — MLB's senior vice president of standards and on-field operations — and issue a statement "hopefully" by Tuesday.

AP source says LA Angels closing in on deal to sign Tim Lincecum: The injury-riddled Los Angeles Angels are closing in on a deal to sign two-time Cy Young Award winner Tim Lincecum, a free agent trying to come back from hip surgery, according to a person with knowledge of the negotiations.

The person spoke to The Associated Press on Monday on condition of anonymity because no deal had been announced.

Lincecum tossed 41 pitches on May 6 for about three dozen scouts representing nearly every major league club in Scottsdale, Arizona, the spring training home of the San Francisco Giants. That's the only team the 31-year-old right-hander has ever pitched for.

Lincecum won the NL Cy Young Award in 2008 and 2009 and made four All-Star Game appearances. He helped the Giants win three World Series titles in five years, and he had a pair of no-hitters against San Diego during an 11-month span between the 2013 and 2014 seasons.

The Angels have been hard-hit by injuries, with seven players currently on the disabled list. They were forced to trade one of their minor league players last week to acquire a fifth starter to complete the rotation, making it possible Lincecum could become a starter.

"You're looking at a lot of depth that we were counting on this year that is not there. We're not sure when it's going to re-emerge," manager Mike Scioscia said. "You can't get through a whole season with five and right now we're pretty thin."

Bonds: Harper should diversify his game to adapt to walks: When pitchers were intentionally walking Barry Bonds more than anyone else in baseball history, his father had a simple message for him.

"It's your fault," Bobby Bonds told his son. "You didn't have to be this good."

That's what Barry Bonds thinks when he sees Bryce Harper getting so many free passes to first base. But he also believes the Washington Nationals outfielder and reigning National League MVP needs to diversity his game if opposing teams are going to take the bat out of his hands.

"He's going to need to learn to steal bases and get to second base and make his teammates' job easier," Bonds recently told The Associated Press.

The Cubs walked Harper 15 times during a four-game series earlier this month, including four times intentionally, and he scored only three runs. Bonds, baseball's intentional walk king, said too much was being made of Ryan Zimmerman's struggles batting behind Harper as the Cubs swept the Nationals.

Teammates had bad series hitting behind Bonds, too, when he was intentionally walked. But Bonds remembers what he said to his children during his playing days.

"My kids used to tell me, 'Daddy, I'm sorry they walk you all the time,'" said Bonds, who led baseball in intentional walks 12 times and tops the all-time list with 688. "I said, 'Yeah, but my job's now to steal.' I could run then, so I had to steal bases and my job's to score runs and keep the pressure on the team regardless of what happened. But I had a different game than him."

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