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College football

Holtz settles lawsuit with Daily Beast: Attorneys for Lou Holtz say the former Notre Dame coach and the news website The Daily Beast have settled a defamation lawsuit filed by the ex-ESPN analyst and college football Hall of Famer.

Orlando, Florida, law firm Morgan & Morgan announced in a news release Monday the two sides came to an amicable resolution. The firm says terms of the settlement were confidential, but The Daily Beast apologized for and corrected the headline that ran July 19, 2016, with a story on Holtz's remarks at a luncheon the Republican National Coalition for Life held during the Republican National Convention.

The headline read: "Lou Holtz at RNC says Immigrants are Deadbeats Invading the U.S." In its apology, The Daily Beast admitted that Holtz did not say immigrants are deadbeats. The Daily Beast said it stands by the rest of its story.

Pro football

Goodell details NFL's stance on sports gambling: NFL commissioner Roger Goodell says Congress should enact uniform standards for any states that plan to legislate sports betting.

Goodell detailed the league's position in a statement Monday that reiterated the NFL's stance that legalized sports gambling in the United States should be governed by federal law rather than state law. The Supreme Court ruled last week to strike down a 1992 law that barred most state-authorized sports gambling.

In suggesting four core principles that should be maintained for any form of legalized sports betting, Goodell stressed that leagues can "protect our content and intellectual property from those who attempt to steal or misuse it." He also said guidelines must provide substantial consumer protections; ensure fans will have access to official, reliable league data; and that law enforcement will have the resources, monitoring and enforcement tools necessary "to protect our fans and penalize bad actors here at home and abroad."

After emphasizing the importance of protecting the integrity of his sport, Goodell noted the NFL has been planning for the potential of legalized sports gambling in states other than Nevada.

"(We) are prepared to address these changes in a thoughtful and comprehensive way, including substantial education and compliance trainings for our clubs, players, employees and partners," he said. "These efforts include supporting common sense legislation that protects our players, coaches and fans and maintains public confidence in our games."

The NFL has long opposed any forms of gambling on its games, though it has approved the move of the Oakland Raiders to Las Vegas in 2020, and has strong ties to fantasy football, which is not tied to the Supreme Court decision.

Many sports leagues have expressed concerns about the varied betting rules each state could pass, where bets could be placed, and who would be overseeing them.

Those leagues also believe they are entitled to an "integrity fee." The easiest way to arrange for a cut of the proceeds would be negotiating with Congress rather than deals with individual states. If it passed a nationwide bill, Congress could require casinos, tracks or state governments to share some of their revenue with the sports leagues — or pay the integrity fees, designed to cover the costs of policing betting.

Olympics

World champion sues USA Swimming, saying it failed to protect her: Olympic swimmer Ariana Kukors Smith sued USA Swimming on Monday, alleging the sport's national governing body knew her former coach sexually abused her as a minor and failed to protect her while shielding him.

Kukors Smith alleges Sean Hutchison, who began coaching her at a swim club near Seattle, groomed her for sexual abuse when she was 13, started touching and kissing her when she was 16, and engaged in sexual activity with her when she was 17.

"This lawsuit is about holding people accountable who should have protected a 15-year-old girl," Kukors Smith told reporters, adding, "I needed help and there were people in positions of power that could have helped me."

Hutchison has denied the allegations, which emerged earlier this year when Kukors Smith, now 28, posted an emotional essay online. Hutchison, assistant coach on the 2008 U.S. Olympic team, has not been charged with a crime. The office of his attorney, Brad Meryhew, said he had no comment on the lawsuit.

The case marked another scandal for USA Swimming and for the sports world, which has faced accusations that coaches and others, including former USA Gymnastics sports doctor Larry Nassar, exploited their positions to sexually abuse athletes in their care.

The U.S. governing body of swimming said it first learned of the underage abuse allegations when Kukors Smith, the 2009 world champion in the 200-meter individual medley who placed fifth in that event at the 2012 Games, posted her essay in February.

"As expressed earlier this year, we respect Ariana Kukors' bravery in stepping forward and sharing her story," USA Swimming said in a statement Monday. "We have been in regular contact with her legal team over the last several months and will continue to work with them and Ariana through this process."

The lawsuit says top USA Swimming officials were well aware in 2005 that Hutchison was in an inappropriate relationship with Kukors Smith, who was then 16. The lawsuit alleges officials did not report it to authorities and didn't protect her.

Top officials at the organization, according to the lawsuit, also manipulated a background screening system to shield coaches, including Hutchison, from a negative background check.

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